Poland

Wasowo

If you are planning a relaxing weekend in a charming neighbourhood, if you want to arrange an unusual party or business meeting, then we recommend a visit to Wasowo. It is also a good option if you need to stop for a night while on a long journey, say while going from the western border to Central Poland or further afield. Conveniently situated in close proximity to the three large towns of Poznan, Zielona Gora and Gorzow Wielkopolski, Wasowo is really an attractive place to stay.

 

Wasowo TOURISM

The largest attraction in Wasowo is the hotel itself, as it is housed in historical buildings. Apart from a Classicist palace and a romantic castle, there is an 18th century chapel and an open-air museum. With its beautiful green surroundings – an extensive park with old oaks and beeches – a stay in Wasowo is really rather relaxing. Near the road linking Wasowo with Chraplewo you will find a magnificent alley, lined with over 400 linden trees. The village has great opportunities for hiking, taking part in horse sleigh rides, cycling or horse -riding. There are only about 1,000 inhabitants.

 

GEOGRAPHY

Wasowo lies near Nowy Tomysl, about 60 west of Poznan, 70 from Zielona Gora and 90 from Gorzow Wielkopolski. It belongs to the Greater Poland Voivodship but is located very close to its border with the Lubusz Voivodship.

 

HISTORY

The history of Wasowo dates back to the 14th century. In the Middle Ages, this area belonged to Benedictine monks. In the late 18th it was bought by Sylwester Sczaniecki, who built his palace there (now the building houses a hotel).

In the next century, another new owner of the grounds was a Berliner called Richard von Hardt and his family, and there he erected a new mock-mediaeval mansion. About 1900, before Prussian Emperor Wilhelm II’s visit, it was extended and turned into a real castle.

Poland regained the territory following World War I. Despite efforts by the government, no one wanted to buy the property, so it was retained by Hardt. After World War II the palace – then owned by the Polish state – was allowed to fall into disrepair. Now it has been returned to its former grandeur, housing a luxury hotel.

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